Treehouse Glamping in Redwood Valley in Wales

By Abi King | Wales

Nov 25

Treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley

Turns out a night of treehouse glamping in Wales can be relaxing and reviving with a toddler in tow. First, what it’s like to sleep in a treehouse. Second, how – and where – you can do it too. 

Treehouse Glamping in Wales

It’s an astonishing feeling to sip morning tea high above the treetops. To see them swaying, sunlight splintering through, to feel with them, swaying slightly, unable to see their base.

The treetop cabin at Redwood Valley seems different to how I’d imagined: not perilous and poky but refreshing and full of the promise of adventure. A steep path leads here, rather than a ladder, the banks of earth thrusting upwards to lift visitors up, up, up and into the forest.

And what a forest it is.

Everything and Nothing

We’re in England, here, you see, but through the forest and across the river is Powys in Wales. That’s also where the owner lives, and the campsite kitchen.

If I lift my head up from the hammock and squint between the leaves, the outline of the kitchen dances in shadows of green.

Freshly made with raw sawn wood, it’s a kitchen as you’d expect anywhere. Except that this lies gloriously outdoors, skilfully hidden from the elements with a sloped roof and key backdrop.

Up here in the cabin, while there isn’t a kitchen, there is actually all that we need.

The Layout

Baby Lab, now a toddler and soon to be two, has accompanied me to this treetop escape.

We have our main cabin, consisting of two linking rooms: one with a comfy double and wardrobe space, the other with a built in sofa and beautifully natural looking wooden table.

In between, sits a bookshelf with titles like Butterflies of the World.

Beneath that, shelves store the essentials: a kettle, tea, mugs, fresh coffee and a cafetiere.

By the bed glints a power point for charging up your phone.

Treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley

Related: Ultimate Desert Glamping: The Ritz Carlton Al Wadi Review

Sleeping in a Treehouse

So it’s camping but not camping. Glamping but better than glamping. More substantial than a yurt. Yet open, still so open, beautifully open to the sky.

On our balcony (yes, we have a balcony) there is a set of table and chairs, with a single stemmed flower rising out of a vase. We dine there, baby Lab and mum, on a feast of cheese and pickle sandwiches we picked up in Presteigne, washed down with milk.

Our plans for the afternoon are simple: to explore the grounds.

There is more, much more to do around here than that, of course, but the beauty of this place is to breathe deep and spend time with nature.

Treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley

Related: The Sleeping Chestnut: A Treehouse for Grown-ups in Galicia Spain

A Family-Friendly Treehouse

And for toddlers, a ten minute path can easily exceed an hour.

The hammock is a hit with baby, too, playing peekaboo in in its linen lavender folds and swinging in the breeze.

There’s a wooden walkway to our kitchen sink, with running water, where the owners have kindly thought to stock up with basic plates, cups and cutlery. It’s not that far down to the kitchen, but it’s far enough with a little one or when you just fancy a cuppa to start or end the day. The toilet, compost like and within about ten safe strides from the front door, smells sweet and comes decorated with pine cones. A mug of sawdust sprinkled into the darkness is all that is required. This is glamping, so, naturally both an opening into the air and a safe stock of toilet paper is provided.

The showers are the only need to trek: fully gas serviced and down next to the kitchen, with eco-friendly toiletries to bubble into the forest air.

Treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley

Related: Crafty Camping: Luxury Glamping Dorset

A Magical Experience

With only one night and the promise of frost, I decide that it’s good to let the natural oils of life work their magic and we skip the shower and listen for the footfall of deer instead.

Around six have been seen here over the last few weeks, some bucks, a new mother, the owner David tells me.

He lives with his family, just off the site, but from the leafy heights of the cabin, it’s easy to believe that no-one else is here from miles and miles around.

Two other yurts live here in Redwood Valley, within easier reach of the main kitchen and the gentle path to the outdoor camp fire zone.

But for our stay, the place is empty, just the call of the buzzards in the sky.

We have space for our own fire, anyway, logs all stocked in a barbecue area outside and a teensy log burner within.

It’s not the first glamping fire for baby Lab and mum. The first time, I felt terrified she would rush past me, diving headfirst into the flames or some other unreasonable terror of new and fledgling motherhood.

But she didn’t. She held back. She watched. And the UK-mandated fireguards would have stopped all that anyway.

Treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley

Related: How to See the Northern Lights Glamping in Finland’s Arctic Circle

Glamping at Redwood Valley

And so the fire is alight.

She watches, fascinated by the flickering, licking curls of orange and yellow but somehow she knows to stay away. Whether it’s an inbuilt imprint of evolution or a sternness in my voice that I can’t fake for table manners, I don’t need or wonder to know.

With the fire flickering overnight, it is warm.

We start by wearing thermals and end in normal PJs, snuggling in one bed alone.

In the morning, the softly spoken owner, will whizz up a secret track to help with our belongings.

But I don’t want to rush ahead too fast.

I don’t want to gloss over the gurgle of the stream and the way we stood for nearly an hour, watching leaves skim and skate across a pond.

The meal we shared with logs as seats, wibble-wobbling over the autumnal crunch below.

The mist in the morning and the call of the birds. The sweet smell of the burning wood or the sight of those giant branches, those ancient oaks that turned and twirled and whirled their way up into the sky.

Over us, under us and seemingly all around us. In a treehouse in England, glamping in Wales.

Treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley

Related: 9 Unusual Things to do in North Wales

Glampingly

Glampingly curates some really fantastic glamping sites. I asked them to recommend other treehouses in case the one in Wales is too far away. Here’s what they told me:

1) Lakeside Lodge, Falmouth

This gorgeous lodge is on the larger size, comfortably sleeping six people. With underfloor heating, a Swedish hot bath on the decking and a log burner, this is a place for those who crave a bit of luxury (and warmth!).

2) Blackberry Wood, East Sussex

You can’t get much more unique than a magical, pagan woodland site, so this glamping site is perfect for those on the hunt for something a bit special and memorable. You’ll find a converted helicopter, a holiday bus, intriguing treehouses, a curvy cabin and a retro caravan. Told you it was different!

Treehouse- Glampingly, Unique accommodation, glamping accommodation

Blackberry Wood, East Sussex

3) Atlantic Treehouse, Bude, Cornwall

With a big trunk going right through this treehouse and views towards the North Cornish coast, this treehouse is the kind of place you retreat to for a bit of quietness. It’s also a romantic spot thanks to the clever roof that allows the moon to provide your evening light.

4) Templar Treehouse, Pembrokeshire

Whether you have kids or you’re just a big kid, this treehouse is so much fun! It has a slide so you can shun the stairs for a more exciting exit. The treehouse is in a private mill garden and includes a fire pit, a hot tub, merino wool bedding for those chilly nights and lots more. It’s a really exciting spot.

5) Temevale Glamping, Worcestershire

If you’re going to enjoy a unique stay, why not add on some unique experiences? At this waterside treehouse you can take advantage of the nearby alpaca-trekking centre. The elevated treehouse sleeps up to six people and is self-contained, so it’s a great chance to escape.

6) The Woodpecker Tree Temple, Norfolk

The whimsical name is completely fitting for such a fairytale location and quirky spot. Set in a nine-acre woodland in rural Norfolk, the round cabin-style glamping accommodation includes a wrap around wooden terrace, hammock and rope swing. With stunning beaches on the doorstep this place is a beautiful getaway.

What to Do Near Redwood Valley

In my opinion it’s all about relaxing and making the most of nature; looking out for the local wildlife and popping on your wellies. The campsite is located in the heart of a dark sky reserve, so evenings are perfect for stargazing. If you’re really keen you could visit the nearby observatory  If you want to guarantee animal sightings head to farm park and owl sanctuary

There’s a small but lively town just under a mile away for those who are keen to do a bit more. Presteigne has a wine bar, four pubs and a collection of independent shops and eateries. Shoppers can continue their spree at Hay on Wye. It also has independent shops, which are especially great for antiques and books.

History-lovers should head to nearby Ludlow Castle.

Where to Eat
Nearby Presteigne has a greengrocer and fishmonger, a deli selling freshly baked bread and fat juicy olives, a local butcher, a wine shop and two small supermarkets – basically enough places for you to pick up supplies to knock up a decent meal. If you’d rather eat out there are four nearby pubs –  The Farmers Inn, The Salty DogThe Radnorshire Arms and The Royal Oak.

What to Bring

  • Travel cot
  • Travel cot bedding
  • Booster seat or high chair gizmo
  • Thermals
  • A need to unwind and a love for the outdoors

 

Disclosure: My stay was kindly hosted, but all opinions and love of nature are well and truly my own.

 

You can find treehouse glamping in Wales at Redwood Valley. If you're looking for a unique glamping experience that's both magical and relaxing, this is what it's like as well as other treehouse glamping ideas in the UK.  #Wales #Glamping #Treehouse
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About the Author

Abigail King is an award-winning writer and author who swapped a successful career as a hospital doctor for a life on the road. With over 60 countries under her belt, she's worked for Lonely Planet, the BBC, National Geographic Traveller and more. She is passionate about sustainable tourism and was invited to speak on the subject at the EU-China High Level summit at the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.Here she writes about food, travel and history and she invites you to pull up a chair and relax. Let's travel more and think more. Welcome!

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