How to Enjoy Madrid’s Literary Quarter – The Gorgeous Barrio de Las Letras

By Abi King | Spain

Oct 08
Madrid Literary Quarter including Map

Madrid’s Literary Quarter is a Treat to Walk Around

Madrid’s Literary Quarter

In the “literary quarter” in Madrid, poetry spills across the streets in flattened golden letters. Bodegas serve cerveza, bitter green olives and fried potato til near the break of dawn. And nuns still keep their silence behind the red brick walls of a nunnery that’s centuries old.

Madrid Literary Quarter Map

Map of Madrid’s Literary Quarter

Cervantes and the World’s First Novel

A fine-muscled statue of Cervantes, clad in tights and clutching a manuscript, peers down on pedestrians in the open air; the author of Don Quixote, arguably the first novel in the world, receives more respect now than he did when he was alive.

Where is Madrid's Literary Quarter?

The literary quarter has a lovely central location, within walking distance of Madrid’s Golden Triangle of Art Museums and bursting with cafes, bars and restaurants. The area runs between Plaza de Santa Ana and Paseo del Prado.

Related: Visiting Cervantes Home – The Shakespeare of Spain

Golden poetry on the floor in Madrid Literary QuarterQuiet street in Madrid Literary Quarter

Cervantes’ Rival: Lope de Vega

Back then, he lived on one of these streets (his daughter in the nunnery) along with writer and rival Lope de Vega. While you can visit the 16th century mansion of Lope, resplendent in dark Tudor-like beams and whitewashed lime walls, Cervantes’ house is no more. Nor is his burial place, the former small churchyard now a sweet garden centre with butterflies, real and papery, fluttering through the trees.

Related: Madrid’s Oldest Chocolateria

Casa Alberto, Madrid Literary Quarter

Founded in 1827

Hidden Secrets in Madrid’s Literary Quarter

The tale of a genius unrecognised in his time whispers through these narrow streets. It passes the 19th century Casa Alberto, painted in blood-like burgundy red to signal its role as a bar and an eatery to a population who, ironically given the location, largely couldn’t read.

Yet the mark of a city that bursts with culture is that not only does it look back, and remember, but that it also looks forwards and celebrates.

Street art in Madrid Literary Quarter

I found this pop of colour coming to life within the literary quarter, inches from where Cervantes remains are thought to rest.

Street Art in the Literary Quarter

Spanish street artists Remed & Okuda scattered silver, sunflower yellow, hot pink and sky blue across the quarter in a three day festival called Streets of Colour (that’s not a translation, it seems that the English language is sexy and cool these days.)

And for all my love of history and (shh, it’s not sexy, museums,) what interests me most about both is how they leave me feeling about today.

Inspired to work harder to create a better world?

Inspired to get down to it and follow those dreams?

Or, on the streets of Madrid, inspired to create in huge bright bursts of colour?

Related: Visiting the Golden Triangle of Art in Madrid

How to Get to Madrid’s Literary Quarter

This spot is very well connected, which is one of the reasons why I think it’s also a great place to stay.

You can catch local trains (Cercanias) Madrid-Atocha and Madrid-Sol and the Metro from Antón Martín (L1), Atocha (L1), Sol (L1, L2, L3)

Where to find the golden letters in Madrid’s Literary Quarter?

Look out for these quotations from great Spanish artists on the floor of Calle de las Huertas.

Disclosure – I love Spain well and have visited many times and even lived there for a while. On this occasion, I visited in partnership with iAmbassador and Madrid Tourism. As ever, as always, I kept the right to write what I like.

Info: I’m very picky about the tour guides I recommend but I’d highly recommend Monica if you’re looking for art and cultural information on the city. You can reach her through the tour programme offered by the tourist office. 

 

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About the Author

Hi, I'm Abi, a doctor turned writer who's worked with Lonely Planet, the BBC, UNESCO and more. Let's travel more and think more. Find out more.

  • You know I’ve never been to Madrid. Sad I know.

  • I ADORE Madrid. ADORE. And this makes me love it even more.

  • Leah says:

    What a beautiful area, I just love the gold poetry on the streets! Madrid is obviously a must-visit for me, one day. Maybe I should read Don Quixote before I go?

  • Madrid has awe-inspiring old neighbourhoods to get lost in. Eat around and take lots and lots of photos. It’s one of my favourite cities in Europe!

  • Hannah says:

    Some great images! Would love to visit Madrid one day…

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